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Another slab of gypsy swing majesty from Jorge’s Hot Club

 

 

Jorge’s Hot Club are a breath of fresh air. Their brand of gypsy swing is infectious. For those of you who haven’t yet had the pleasure of witnessing their barnstorming live sets Jorge’s Hot Club pilfer pop culture for its ripest musical apples to re-interrupt it to their DIY gypsy punk vibe. In the past Disney classics like King of the Swingers and Everybody Wants to Be a Cat have been put through Jorge’s musical mangle. Now they’ve turned their attention of pop music from the 1930’s.

 

 

Bei Mir Bist Du Schoen was originally a hit for the Andrew Sisters in 1938. Loosely translated to Mean That You’re Grand, the song is about trying to woe a partner by flattering them. The chorus sums this up “Bei mir bist du schon, you’ve heard it all before, but let me try to explain, Bei mir bist du schon means that you’re grand, Bei mir bist du schon, it’s such an old refrain, and yet I should explain, It means I am begging for your hand”, but it’s in the delivery that Jorge and co really sells its message.

 

 

2017 is looking like the year the gypsy swing really tries to crossover into the mainstream media, after bubbling along under the surface. Through the rise of the Post-Modern Jukebox the genre is starting to reach a bigger audience, but what separates Jorge’s Hot Club from their peers is their wild abandon, their ability to shred and their ability to turn even the most serious subject matter into something that makes you want to dance!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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consuumer are on the brink, but what is on the other side, only they know

 

 

What do you get if you mix the grunge, proto-punk and doom rock? You get Brighton based noise rock duo consuumer. This duo managed to combine the energy of The Stooges, the intensity of Sunn O))), the technical beauty of Black Sabbath and noise of the Melvins to create something that shakes you to your core with every note played.

 

After releasing their debut single, Radio, and playing pretty much anywhere and everywhere they are about to unleash their debut EP Shattered Fruit. The band recently said “I think that as a whole the EP works within themes of being young, confused and uncomfortable, both of us work jobs we hate to fund doing the thing we love and I think that the frustration of not being where we want to be and not necessarily being comfortable in our own skin made the record quite cathartic for us.” This definitely comes across. At times it feels like these noise-niks are so angry with the world all they can do is scream and attack their instruments, yet at other times of melodic introspection it feels like they are world weary and just want everyone to get along.

 

 

This is exemplified on title track Shattered Fruit sounds like Lightning Bolt covering Black Sabbath’s Sweet Leaf at their most laidback. This is in fact a massive compliment as it shows that, unlike some of their peers, consuumer known when to make an unholy racket but never at the expense of the song.

 

 

Shattered Fruit is released on 13th January

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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God’s Teeth and The Interstellar Tropics isn’t a name that runs off the tongue easily. The same can be said for their music. Instead of gliding out of your speakers or headphones it comes forth ungainly, with jerks and spasms. This of course is to its benefit. If it was smooth and slick it wouldn’t be God’s Teeth and The Interstellar Tropics, would it?

 

 

The music is abrasive and awkward. It’s full of tonal juxtapositions and melodies. At first sounds out of sorted with itself and idiosyncratic, but after a few minutes you realise that this is far from the truth. Under all the off-centre layers of ad-hoc rhythm you find purpose and regimented melodies. Granted it doesn’t have a polished sheen, but it’s not meant to. It’s meant to sound unorthodox from the skitter drumming, to its wailing guitars and clock chimes. Everything is designed to put your on edge, while trying to make you feel comfortable. In the sequence where it sounds like a ruler is being thwocked on a table there is a very catchy melody playing just below it. This technique peppers the album, and adds to its charm.

 

 

What GTatIT have done is make black and white psychedelic drone. This might sound like a slight, but I promise it is not. It is in fact high praise. Instead of using every instrument they could get their hands on GTatIT have used a few, but inter woven them to create something that is as terrifying as it is delightful. What they’ve done is similar to 1950’s B-Movies. They trick us into thining they’re in colour. I’ve watch Plan 9 and Quatermass and the Pit so many times that I could tell you what colour certain characters of the film are. The same is true for Kim Deitch’s. I would swear that Smilin’ Ed was in colour as it’s so vivid and exciting, but alas its in black and white. The same is true for GTatIT. And that’s the greatest trick.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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